Blues All Day Long: The Jimmy Rogers Story (Music in American Life)

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Published by

Claude Corry

Being a musician from a young age I began singing at the age of five. I have been a live performer for about thirty years and have played in many bands from covers bands to original ensembles. At twenty I began to write a lot of my own songs and still do today and have written about two hundred works.

3 thoughts on “Blues All Day Long: The Jimmy Rogers Story (Music in American Life)”

  1. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    were just wild and serious young musicians determined to perfect their sound and broadcast it to the world, August 22, 2014
    By 
    Adam Gussow (Oxford, MS United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Blues All Day Long: The Jimmy Rogers Story (Music in American Life) (Paperback)
    It’s an incredible book. It does in its own way what CADILLAC RECORDS does in a slightly different way: it puts you in the shoes of Muddy and Jimmy as they arrive in Chicago from Mississippi: two young guys on the make, hungry to birth the new music they’ve got banging around in their heads, rehearsing nonstop in their apartment, and then tumbling onto the street, heading down to Maxwell Street, and kicking ass as the tips pour in. He shows you the romance and the musical seriousness. It was a revelation to realize that two Chicago legends, before they were legends, were just wild and serious young musicians determined to perfect their sound and broadcast it to the world. I was amazed at how many new shades Goins added to the story, even as he captured that deep and powerful impulse. He interviewed a lot of people–white musicians, too, from the early days as well as later days–and he takes you through every phase of Rogers’s story, from first to last. He evokes Chicago’s tumultuous racial dynamics without ever making race more of the point of the story than it needs to be. This is a book about MUSICIANS, pure and simple. You won’t be able to put the book down.

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  2. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Good piece of work; good reading., August 24, 2014
    By 

    This review is from: Blues All Day Long: The Jimmy Rogers Story (Music in American Life) (Paperback)
    Jazz historian Wayne Goins’ “Blues All Day Long” is an excellently written biography of Jimmy Rogers (1924-1997), who, starting in the mid 1940’s, was one of the leaders in the Chicago-style Blues movement. Although he is not as well known as Muddy Waters, the originator of the style, Jimmy was influential in its development.
    In “Blues,” we meet numerous other Blues musicians, and learn, among other things, the instruments they played (many of them played several), whom they played with, the names of their bands, where they played, what the life of the Chicago night-club musician was like, and how the race recording business operated.
    Despite the amazing amount of information packed into each sentence, “Blues” is well written and easily readable. Its 316 page text is fully documented with endnotes, an extensive discography, an impressive list of people interviewed (91), a lengthy bibliography, and a comprehensive index. No wonder it took Goins seven years to research and write it.
    Read “Blues All Day Long” for an understanding of Jimmy Rogers’ personality, life, and contribution to the Blues movement.
    Christopher Banner

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  3. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great blues biography of one of the greats!, August 22, 2014
    By 
    Walter Dodds “Walter” (Kansas, USA) –

    This review is from: Blues All Day Long: The Jimmy Rogers Story (Music in American Life) (Paperback)
    This is a deeply researched volume on Jimmy Rogers, who with Muddy Waters and Little Walter defined the Chicago blues sound. The book has an intro written by Kim Wilson and endorsements from Taj Mahal, Charlie Musselwhite and Dick Shurman among others. The book really gets into the Chicago sound and its development, the decline and re-discovery of the blues. There are great insights into Chess records and the Muddy Water era, as well as information on Rogers from cradle to grave, all written clearly and engagingly.

    If you are into blues scholarship and history, this is a must have addition to your collection.

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